Museu Picasso

Fernande Olivier

(Paris, 1881 – Neuilly-sur-Seine, 1966)​

Fernande Olivier's real name was Amélie Lang. An artist's model, she met Picasso in 1904 and the couple lived together until 1912. This was the period during which Picasso began to depict women rather than men in his portraits. Fernande Olivier wrote two books on the artist: Picasso et ses amis (1933), published in English as
Picasso and His Friends in 1964, and Souvenirs intimes: écrits pour Picasso (1955). Her almond eyes, straight nose, high cheekbones, robust neck and abundant hair, all provided the artist with a source of inspiration during his evolutionary years of cubism, and she was the first great muse, whose portraits evolved into a flattering resemblance to an experimental representation.

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1
Cubist Head (Portrait of Fernande)
1909 - 1910
Oil on canvas
66 x 55 cm
The Syndics of the Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge. PD. 13-1974

2
Fernande Olivier with a Black Mantilla
1905 - 1906
Óleo sobre lienzo
100 x 81 cm
Salomon R. Guggenheim Museum, Nova York Thannhauser Collection. Llegat de Hilde Thannhauser, 1991. 91.3914

3
Head of a Woman (Fernande Olivier)
1909
Bronze
41,3 cm
Leonard A. Lauder. Cubist Collection

4
Head of a woman [Fernande Olivier]
París, 1906
Bronze
35,7 x 24,8 x 25,4 cm
MPB113035

5
Fernande Olivier
1905 - 1906
Charcoal or black chalk on paper
31,5 x 24,5 cm
Col·lecció particular. Cortesia Fundación Almine y Bernard Ruiz-Picasso para el Arte

Room 3